Presenting: Bravestation

Bravestation are an excellent up-and-coming band based out of Toronto. Comprising of brothers Derrick and Devin Wilson and childhood friend, Jeremy Rossetti, Bravestation create mesmerizing and often haunting music; weaving an atmospheric soundscape of otherworldly vocals, unique synths and intricate …
By Isaac Kuehnle-Nelson

Bravestation are an excellent up-and-coming band based out of Toronto. Comprising of brothers Derrick and Devin Wilson and childhood friend, Jeremy Rossetti, Bravestation create mesmerizing and often haunting music; weaving an atmospheric soundscape of otherworldly vocals, unique synths and intricate instrumentation. The genre label ‘apocalypse pop’, coined by the band itself seems an accurate descriptor for their music, as Bravestation draws you in to their artfully crafted and often ethereal worlds of music.

Bravestation create mesmerizing and often haunting music; weaving an atmospheric soundscape of otherworldly vocals, unique synths and intricate instrumentation.

Their album ‘IV’ released in May of 2013, was a continuation of the strengths found in the earlier 2012 album ‘Giants and Dreamers’, but introduced a more rhythmic backdrop. It is an exciting time for the band, and we had a chance to interview Bravestation; who hint at an upcoming release destined for later this year, read the full interview below for details.

How would you define ‘Apocalypse Pop’?

We want our music to be ambiguous and evoke imagination; as a genre descriptor, ‘Apocalypse Pop’ does that for us. The word apocalypse represents an interesting duality as it can mean destruction/disaster or prophecy/revelation. Calling ourselves a New-Wave Indie Rock band seems equally as subjective and slightly less interesting. (Derek)

Bravestation performing on stage

Via Dylan Leeder at Southern Souls

 

Via Dylan Leeder at Southern Souls

 

Your music combines carefully crafted electronic composition with distinct vocals and instrumentation, can you describe how you arrived at your sound?

I think our current sound is a product of our limitations to be honest. We don’t have the resources to record on an amazing console with amazing gear – we can’t even record a real drum kit at this point really. I mean, we could, but it would cost a lot of money and we’re trying to keep our overhead as low as possible for obvious reasons. Because we do everything ourselves in a home studio with minimal gear, we’re forced to experiment with sounds on the computer in order to achieve anything remotely interesting. Because we aren’t subject to the hands of a clock we’re able to spend as much time as we’d like sculpting the sounds. Everyone likes to have their mark on the music so there ends up being a ton of textures and instrumentation. The trickiest part is massaging it all at the end so that it doesn’t end up sounding like a bunch of indecipherable mud. When there’s a lot going on, you really have to think carefully about how loud each texture should be, how much they should be panned to one side, when they should happen etc. We just do our best to create something interesting and I think we’re all pretty happy with how IV turned out. It’s not the slickest sounding thing around, but we’re fine with that. (Devin)

Do you have any projects brewing?

We’re currently working on another collection of songs. It’s hard to say how many we’ll release, but there are at least 10 ideas in the Bravestation Dropbox waiting to be worked on. We’ll likely pick 4 or 5 in the end to refine and finish for a release as soon as possible – we’d like to have something ready for late Fall/early Winter. Other than that, just staying creative in any ways possible and rehearsing to keep sharp for any good show opportunities that may pop up. (Devin)

we’d like to have something ready for late Fall/early Winter.

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On your Bandcamp you state that your name Bravestation derives from the work of Aldous Huxley and Robert J. Hastings, to what extent does literature and poetry influence your music?

Both have fascinating ideas and imagery that really capture the vibe we’re after when thinking about and creating music from a lyrical and sonic perspective. They’ve been inspirational in giving us a reference point from which to write and take ideas from. We’re often trying to channel the overarching concepts found in these works. (Derek)

You have explored creative recording techniques, how does production fit into your music?

Production and recording techniques have primarily been means to an end for us. However, since our friend/former bandmate/recording engineer Andrew left to pursue other opportunities, we’ve become more interested with the technical side of making music out of pure necessity. It’s actually a lot of fun (when you’re computer isn’t freezing all the time and showing you the pinwheel of death). (Derek)

If people want to find out more about you, where should they go?

www.bravestation.bandcamp.com | www.facebook.com/bravestation | www.twitter.com/bravestation | www.soundcloud.com/bravestation